Neighborhood Place-Making Essentials: Community Institutions - Part 3

Neighborhood Place-Making Essentials: Community Institutions - Part 3

An Appreciation

Eugene Coleman’s Canon Kip was the penultimate realization of “social capital.” It was a place of many positive purposes, a network of many caring individuals and organizations. It was an inspiration for many spirits of all ages - it was the glue that held a community together. It was the Heart of our SOMA of that generation. Bishop Swing never grasped or valued this. And we have never been able to fully replace it.

Neighborhood Place-Making Essentials: Community Institutions - Part 2

Neighborhood Place-Making Essentials: Community Institutions - Part 2

The Death of Canon Kip Community House

The San Francisco Episcopal Diocese fired Gene Coleman in 1985, closed Canon Kip in 1989, one year after its 100th anniversary, and finally tore the building down in 1992. It was ultimately replaced with low-income supportive housing, the Canon Barcus Community House built and operated by Episcopal Community Services that opened in 2002.

Neighborhood Place-Making Essentials: Community Institutions - Part 1

Neighborhood Place-Making Essentials: Community Institutions - Part 1

Once upon a time in SOMA, Canon Kip Community House was the heart of the South of Market... and Gene Coleman was the heart of Canon Kip.

I’ll never forget my first visit to Canon Kip at Eighth and Natoma Streets early in 1978. It looked like a drab-green concrete warehouse and I couldn’t spot a front door. A plain metal double door down the alley looked like a service entrance. I gave it a try – and walked like Alice through the Looking Glass into a wonderful place and time: a genuine “Community Center.”

Neighborhood Open Space: Why Nice Community Ideas Don't Always Work Out in Real Life

Neighborhood Open Space: Why Nice Community Ideas Don't Always Work Out in Real Life

SOMA’s Tutubi Plaza and Annie Alley pavement-to-plaza-and-back-to-pavement sagas show how the best of intentions and wonderful ideas are just not enough. Successful, clean and safe public spaces also need full-time responsible managers to succeed. And so do public parks.

San Francisco Voters Very Strongly Favor Maintaining or Increasing the Requirements for Inclusionary Affordable Housing in New Market Rate Developments!

The Yerba Buena Neighborhood Consortium, the advocacy arm of the South of Market affordable housing developer TODCO Group, commissioned a poll of likely San Francisco voters by David Binder and Associates last week to research public opinions about the City’s Inclusionary Affordable Housing laws. Two competing proposals are now pending legislative action by the City’s Board of Supervisors. One is proposed by the Mayor’s Office, the other by Supervisors Kim and Peskin. Here are the key findings of that poll.

Community/City Building Success: The Sixth Street Redevelopment Project

Community/City Building Success: The Sixth Street Redevelopment Project

The new Bill Sorro Community apartments that opened this month is the final project - the "completion" - of the 1990 South of Market (Sixth Street) Redevelopment Area, the City's most ambitious Loma Prieta Earthquake recovery effort. It only took 27 years!

Neighborhood Place-Making Essentials: The Neighborhood Bar - Part 3

Neighborhood Place-Making Essentials: The Neighborhood Bar - Part 3

But i’m not feeling that vibe in SOMA much anymore, not with today’s generation of new arrivals. The clubs and bars are full certainly, but they feel like a package, like tourist places do, not authentic and rooted. Am i just missing it?

Will there be a Next Generation of Neighborhood Bars in SOMA to replace the last one?

Neighborhood Place-Making Essentials: The Neighborhood Bar - Part 1

Neighborhood Place-Making Essentials: The Neighborhood Bar - Part 1

I’ve spent more total hours of my life in San Francisco in the neighborhood bars/cafés of North Beach and SOMA (and some other places) than anywhere else. So I have to postulate that no place can really be a genuine Neighborhood without an honest-to-god Neighborhood Bar.

The planner/analyst in me requires a definition in order to address a topic, so here it is: a neighborhood bar/café is a modest storefront business offering beer/wine at least, if not a full bar, with a distinct personality and a core clientele of regulars from the local community and beyond who ‘hang’ and socialize there, that has been that way for at least five years –  usually much longer.